Year 10 Exam Resources

Click below for the resources provided by departments for the upcoming Year 10 Exam Week (w/c 14 January 2019).

Y10 Exam Resources

The sections below detail the curriculum for Year 10 students at QEHS.

Please use the following guide to help you decide the appropriate point of contact for any curriculum-related issues:

Nature of EnquiryContactPhone/Email
General questions about your child's work, progress, or homeworkSubject teachersBy note via your child or by contacting the main switchboard on 01434 610300
A concern about your child's progress or experience in a particular subjectCurriculum/Subject Leaders (see Meet Our Staff)Contact the main switchboard on 01434 610300
General enquiries related to the curriculum, options, higher education applications or complex academic issues involving more than one subjectThe Curriculum TeamTelephone the Curriculum Office on 01434 610312 or email curriculum@qehs.net
Other matters not listed aboveReceptionPlease phone 01434 610300 and we will direct your enquiry to the appropriate person

Autumn Term

Students will be learning about cell cycle, stem cells and cell transport. We will focus on mitosis and the uses of stem cells as a potential treatment for some medical conditions. Cell transport will include diffusion and osmosis. We will carry out required practical 7 which is linked to osmosis and carry out linked exam practice questions.

Assessment – Cell cycle, stem cells, and cell transport – 30 minute test in November.

Students will be learning about the organisation of living things in Topic 2. We will focus on tissues and organs in particular. We will study the digestive and circulatory systems to illustrate the organisation of cells into tissues and organs. We will also carry out research into the effects of lifestyle on these organ systems and how they may lead to a range of non-communicable diseases including cancer.

Spring Term

Students will be learning about plant tissues and organs. They will study processes such as transpiration and will carry out practical activities to measure the rate of transpiration.

Assessment – Students will sit a 1-hour test in exam week (January). They will be tested on the first half of Topic 2 ‘Organisation’ which includes the digestive system, enzymes, heart, blood & blood vessels, coronary heart disease, and lungs.

Students will be also be learning about bioenergetics (Topic 4). This includes photosynthesis and respiration. There will be several opportunities for practical work as students investigate factors that affect both of these processes.

Assessment – bioenergetics written test in May.

Summer Term

Students will begin learning about ecology (Topic 7). In this topic, they will learn about ecosystems and how materials are recycled naturally within them. They will learn about biotic and abiotic factors and how they affect the organisms that live within communities. They will also learn about the human impact on the environment and how to live in a sustainable way. As part of this topic students will need to complete some sampling work outdoors for required practical 9.

Assessment – all students will set a formal test in June on all of the Paper 1 content (Topics 1–4).

Autumn/Spring Term

Theme 1: Investigating small business (*Paper code: 1BS0/01)

Theme 1 comprises five topic areas:

  • Topic 1.1 Enterprise and entrepreneurship – students are introduced to the dynamic nature of business in relation to how and why business ideas come about. They also explore the impact of risk and reward on business activity and the role of entrepreneurship.
  • Topic 1.2 Spotting a business opportunity – students will explore how new and small businesses identify opportunities through understanding customer needs and conducting market research. They will also focus on understanding the competition.
  • Topic 1.3 Putting a business idea into practice – this topic focuses on making a business idea happen through identifying aims and objectives and concentrating on the financial aspects.
  • Topic 1.4 Making the business effective – students will explore a range of factors that impact on the success of the business, including location, the marketing mix and the business plan.
  • Topic 1.5 Understanding external influences on business – students are introduced to a range of factors, many of which are outside of the immediate control of the business, such as stakeholders, technology, legislation and the economy. Students will explore how businesses respond to these influences.

Assessment overview for theme 1 (exam summer 2019)

The paper is divided into three sections:

  • Section A: 35 marks
  • Section B: 30 marks
  • Section C: 25 marks

The paper will consist of calculations, multiple-choice, short-answer and extended-writing questions. Questions in Sections B and C will be based on business contexts given in the paper.

Autumn Term

Topic 3 – Structure and Bonding

  • Ionic Bonding
  • Covalent Bonding
  • Giant Structures
  • Polymers and Nanoscience
  • Chromatography

Spring Term

Topic 4 – Metal Extraction and Quantitative Calculations

  • Relative Atomic and Formula Masses, Mole Calculations
  • Yield Calculations
  • Acid and Alkalis
  • Titrations
  • Gas Liquid and Thin Layer Chromatography
  • Reductions
  • Electrolysis – Salt, Aluminium and Fuel Cells

Summer Term

Topic 5 – Rate of Reaction

  • How is rate affected by concentration, temperature, particle size and catalysis
  • Reversible Reactions
  • Equilibria

Roll up to Year 11 (after Summer Half Term)

Topic 6 – Analysis

  • Chromatography
  • Gas Testing
  • Testing for Positive and Negative Ions (Triple Chemistry only)
  • Instrumental Analysis (Triple Chemistry only)

Autumn Term

Students will develop their knowledge and understanding of website design through a series of design tasks. Each site will be designed, tested and evaluated in preparation for their first external assessment in January.

Spring Term

After completion of the controlled assessment, students will move in to the world of game design. Research and evaluation of the complete package for a game will take place, looking into what is successful and how things vary for different styles of games.

External Assessment: January (usually the second week).

Summer Term

Students will start to look at the coursework task for this unit and carry out a series of practice tasks to prepare them for elements of the assessment in Year 11. This will include learning about the game development software that they will use for the main part of their coursework.

Autumn Term

Students will spend the first term of the course covering the underlying theory of computing. Topics such as data representation, hardware, software, networking and logic will be covered, along with a look at the moral and ethical considerations in the world of technology. They will also look at relevant legislation.

End of topic tests: end of October, December.

Spring Term

Students will start to look at programming tools and techniques. They will learn psuedo-code and put it into practice with a range of programming languages and environments.

Summer Term

Students will focus on preparing for the controlled assessment to be sat in the autumn term of Year 11.

GCSE Design and Technology – exam board Edexcel

Summer Term (Year 9 roll up to Year 10)

Half Term 1 (June to July)

The students will begin the course by completing a baseline test. This will cover all knowledge learnt previously. This will include some mathematical questions.

Year 10 is dedicated to teaching the content of Component 1 (Core Unit)

Project: Designers and Designing

The students will be involved in an iterative designing process while learning about famous designers and their work to influence their designs. They will also build on their skills of technical and presentation drawings.

Autumn Term

Half Term 2 (September to October)

Project: Wood Joint Box

The students will be involved in a focused practical task to learn about and practice a wide range of woodworking and joining techniques. They will also gain knowledge of different timbers/manufactured boards and discover their properties and applications. Students will enhance their practical work using a range of wood finishing processes.

There will also be an introductory element into sheet metal working processes as well as using some basic CAD/CAM.

Internal Common Assessment: Timbers and their applications and properties. Practical work assessed. Wood joints drawing task.

Half Term 3 (November to December)

Project: Night Light Project

The students are involved in theory and practical lessons to design and manufacture a night light. Students gain a knowledge and understanding of basic electronic components and their function and will demonstrate practical activities including drilling PCBs and soldering. Students will also be involved in using CAD and CAM to produce a laser cut casing for their electronic circuit. Theory lessons covering the properties and applications of card and paper will be delivered to the students. Basic programming skills round off this particular project.

Project: Levers and Mechanisms

Students will then complete a theory based project about mechanical systems. Included in the module are topics such as levers and linkages, cams, pulleys, gears and gear ratios. Alongside this they will also learn a number of mathematical calculations associated with levers and mechanisms

Internal Common Assessment: Knowledge of resistors, transistors, LEDs and other common components. Mathematical calculations associated with the movements.

Spring Term

Half Term 4 (January to February)

Project: Core Materials and Sources of Power

This half term the students are taught a module of theory lessons about core materials. Topics will include metals, shape memory alloys, reactive glass, nanomaterials, textiles and a range of composite materials including carbon fibre and concrete. In addition to the core materials student will also learn about different sources of power.

Internal Common Assessment: A range of in class tests will be used to check the students understanding of the topics covered.

Half Term 5 (February to April)

Students will then learn about the impacts of new technology focusing on the environment and sustainability, this includes topics such as carbon and ecological footprint, life cycles and sustainability, Fair trade, green designs, recycling and reusing and other associated topics.

Internal Common Assessment: A range of in class tests will be used to check the students understanding of the topics covered.

Summer Term

Half Term 6 (April to May)

Students will then move on to learn about the wider impact of new technology focusing on Society and industry. This will include topics such as levels of production, enterprise, people and workforce in design and technology. This will lead on to the implications of designers on society and the economy and the ethical issues designers much consider.

Internal Common Assessment: A range of in class tests will be used to check the students understanding of the topics covered.

Autumn Term

Course Introduction: Students will be introduced to safe practice, development of contemporary dance technique and developing physical and interpretive skills for technique and performance.

  • Unit 3 – Performance in a Duo/Group (20%)
  • Unit 1 – Dance Appreciation (20%)

Students prepare a duo/group dance lasting 3 minutes that has three clear links to professional work 1.

  • Unit 2 – Set Dance (20%)

Learn and rehearse a set dance lasting 1 minute.

All work in these units will focus on physical, technical and mental skills necessary for effective performance. Also covered are expressive skills in performance and understanding how to achieve high quality performance. There is a focus on knowledge and understanding of health, fitness and safe working practice.

Spring Term

  • Unit 4 – Choreography (40%) & Unit 1 – Dance Appreciation (20%)

Task A Solo Composition (15%) linked to professional work 2. Students learn three motifs from professional work 2 and develop these into a solo composition lasting approximately 1 minute.

This term will focus on the critical appreciation of professional work and the students will be required to conduct research, investigating potential ideas and improvise from the initial stimulus.

  • Unit 4 – Choreography (40%)

Task B – Solo/Group Composition (25%) Introduction

Students select a stimulus from a prescribed list and develop it into either a group choreography lasting 2 ½ – 3 minutes or a solo choreography lasting 1 ½ – 2 minutes.

Summer Term

  • Unit 4 – Choreography (40%)

Task B – Solo/Group Composition (25%) Introduction

Students continue to work on the development of their choreography.

Autumn Term

Component 1: Devising (40%)

Students begin the course by learning about stylised theatre skills which they will go on to use in each practical element of the course. This will involve a series of workshops, culminating in a piece of theatre devised by the group to demonstrate their knowledge and understanding of the techniques they’ve used. This will feed into their assessment week in October.

After autumn half term the students will be given their stimulus material and allocated their final component 1 groups. The early stages of this component will involve whole class exploration and research, and as the groups are formed students will take on responsibility for their progress and area of interest. This will involve self-evaluation and compromise as well as a real creative and practical challenge. The assessment includes a portfolio which can be either written or recorded, which will document their process and evaluate the success of the final performance piece.

Spring Term

Component 1: Devising (40%)

Students will continue to work in their groups to refine and rehearse their devised performances. Work on the portfolios will continue during lessons and for homework. Extra rehearsals at lunchtimes and after school are strongly recommended. Rooms can be booked in advance through the department.

Component 3: Written Exam (40%)

We will arrange a theatre visit for students so that they can complete a mock evaluation in preparation for their component 3 exam.

Summer Term

Component 1: Devising (40%)

Students will perform their devised plays and complete the first draft of their portfolios. This will conclude the class time on component 1. This work is internally marked by the drama teachers in the department and will be moderated later in the year by an external moderator.

Component 2: Performing Exam (20%)

Students will begin preparation for their performance exam. This will involve being allocated a new group and a scripted play to study.

Component 3: Written Exam (40%)

Students will begin preparatory work on the set text, DNA by Dennis Kelly. This will involve reading the play and practical workshops.

Autumn Term

Students will study a range of 19th-century short stories and extracts, including the Gothic genre. They will also develop their imaginative writing skills and be able to plan ideas based on visual stimulus.

There will be a focus on how to use sentences and vocabulary for effect.

Spring Term

Students will evaluate connections and develop their reading skills by comparing 20th- and 21st-century texts using a thematic approach. Students will be able to show understanding of the relationships between texts and the contexts in which they were written.

They will then move onto transactional writing tasks, where they will develop their ability to use of a range of vocabulary and sentence structures for clarity, purpose and effect.

Summer Term

Students will revisit the requirements for Paper 1. Students will undertaking a range of speaking and listening tasks to enable them to: demonstrate presentation skills in a formal setting; listen and respond appropriately to spoken language; use spoken Standard English effectively in speeches and presentations.

Autumn Term

Students will study eight poems from the relationships cluster and develop skills to: analyse language, form, structure; maintain a critical style and informed personal response; make effective comparisons across the set poems.

Students will study ‘A Christmas Carol’ by Charles Dickens for a closed book examination. Students will develop close language analysis skills and be able to use textual references, including quotations, to support and illustrate interpretations of the novel.

Spring Term

Students will study the remaining seven poems from the relationships cluster and focus on comparison skills. Students will study a range of modern poetry and develop their ability to analyse the language, form and structure used by a writer to create meanings and effects, using relevant subject terminology where appropriate.

Summer Term

Students will study Macbeth in depth, enabling them to: appreciate the depth and power of the English literary heritage; write accurately, effectively and analytically about their reading, use Standard English; acquire and use a wide vocabulary, including grammatical terminology, and other literary and linguistic terms they need to criticise and analyse what they read.

Autumn Term

Students will develop their understanding of the formal elements of art and design. They will explore analyse and research the theme as part of Unit 1 Portfolio (60% of GCSE). Contextual work will include research on contemporary artists.

Spring Term

Students will embark on the research aspect of their second themed project based on either Lost and Found or Structures (portfolio).

Summer Term

Students continue to develop their second project through design ideas and experimentation (portfolio).

Autumn Term

  • Key Stage 3 Revision
  • Me, my family and friends
  • Relationships with family and friends
  • Marriage/partnership
  • Technology in everyday life
  • Social media
  • Mobile technology

Spring Term

  • Free-time activities
  • Music
  • Cinema and TV
  • Food and eating out
  • Sport
  • Customs and festivals in French-speaking countries/communities

Summer Term

  • Home, town, neighbourhood and region
  • Social issues
  • Charity/voluntary work
  • Healthy/unhealthy living

Please note: Due to the reforms in Geography and the increased content in the new specification, we have decided to start covering the content of the Edexcel B GCSE course from Year 9 onwards. We are in a period of transition from a two year course to a three year course which is why there appears to be some duplication in the teaching of topics between the year groups.

Autumn Term

Students will study the following topics:

Tropical cyclones: Students will explore the causes of these hazards, where they occur and the impacts that they have on people and the environment. They will track a hurricane and make important decisions about when to evacuate. Students will assess the factors affecting vulnerability through the case studies of Hurricane Katrina which hit the USA, and Cyclone Aila which hit Bangladesh.

Climate change: Students will develop an understanding of the global circulation of the atmosphere and our changing climate. The natural causes of climate change will be explored along with the evidence, such as ice cores, tree rings and historic sources, to prove our climate was different in the past. The human causes are then studied along with the evidence and possible consequences for people and the environment

Development: Students will learn about the scale of inequality and how it can be reduced. They will apply what they have learned to India which is the main case study for this topic. Students will explore the factors that have allowed the country to develop and investigate the positive and negative impacts of such rapid growth.

Spring Term

Students will complete the Development topic before moving onto the following topics:

Coastal change and conflict: Students will explore why there are a variety of distinctive coastal landscapes in the UK and will learn about the processes which have created them.

The UK’s evolving human landscapes: Students will learn why places and people are changing in the UK. London will be the main case study for this topic and students will investigate the growth of London over time and also the decline and regeneration that has occurred in some parts of the city.

Summer Term

Students will study the following topics:

River processes and pressures: Students will learn how river landscapes contrast between the upper courses, mid-courses and lower courses of rivers and why channel characteristics change along the course of a named UK river. They will also study the causes of flooding and they will conduct a piece of physical fieldwork on the Cockshaw Burn in Hexham which will assess the flood risk of this area.

In Year 10, German and Spanish cover aspects within the following topic headings plus grammar, though in a different order according to each language:

  • Me, my family and friends, relationships with family and friends
  • Home, town, neighbourhood and region, weather
  • My studies
  • Free time, including music, cinema, eating out, sport
  • Healthy/unhealthy living
  • Life at school
  • Customs and festivals
  • Travel and tourism
  • Education post-16

There are no internal assessments other than calendared assessment weeks, and there is no controlled assessment.

Autumn Term

Students will develop their skill set by learning a range of new graphic techniques and processes under the title assignment of ‘Pop’. They will work on Photoshop and use the project as introduction to the extensive programme. They will present their work on layout boards and will use this essential resource as a reference throughout their GCSE studies.

Spring Term

Students will start their second unit of work entitled ‘Altered Image’ in which students will use a mix of both hand rendered and Photoshop manipulated designs. They will study the work of others designers and illustrators to help them develop their ideas.

Summer Term

Students will complete their second unit by creating a set of designs for album art work for a chosen band or musician.

BTEC First Health and Social Care (exam board: Edexcel)

In Year 10 students will complete two units of work:

  • Unit 1 Human Lifespan Development – Assessed via external exam (25%)
  • Unit 2 Health and Social Care Values – Assessed via coursework (25%)

Two remaining units are completed in Year 11 (50%)

Autumn Term

Students will start the course by starting Unit 2: Health and Social Care Values. Students will develop a range of study skills in order to produce coursework for internal assessment. Students are assessed throughout the course via different methods of assessment including:

  • Presentations
  • Reports
  • Factsheets
  • Practical Analysis
  • Posters
  • Leaflets
  • Role play scenarios

Unit 2 includes the following topics:

  • Explore the care values that underpin current practice in health and social care
  • Investigate ways of empowering individuals who use health and social care services

Spring Term

Students will complete Unit 2 in the Spring Term and will then build knowledge for an external exam in the Summer Term. The exam Unit 1 includes the following topics:

  • Explore human growth and development across life stages
  • Investigate factors that affect human growth and development and how they are interrelated

Summer Term

Students will complete Unit 1 and prepare for the final external exam assessment in the summer term.

External Assessment – June

Autumn/Spring Term

Paper 1: Understanding the Modern World

Section A: Russia 1894-1945: Democracy and Dictatorship

This period study focuses on the development of Russia during a turbulent half century of change. It was a period of autocracy and communism – the fall of the Tsardom and the rise and consolidation of communism. Students will study the political, economic, social and cultural aspects of these two developments and the role ideas played in influencing change. Students will also look at the role of key individuals and groups in shaping change and the impact the developments had on them.

Part One: The End of Tsardom

  • Russia’s economy and society: industrialisation; living and working conditions in cities and villages.
  • Nicholas II’s autocracy and the court: growth of revolutionary opposition; the 1905 Revolution and October Manifesto; the impact of, and reactions to, attempts to reform Russia up to 1914; the Dumas and political stalemate; Stolypin’s policies – land reform, industry and use of oppression.
  • The First World War: the impact of military defeats on Tsarist government; social and economic effects of war on cities and the countryside; unpopularity of the Romanovs, including the role of Rasputin; the Tsar’s abdication.

Part Two: Lenin’s New Society

  • The Provisional Government: its failure to deal with Russia’s social, economic and military problems; Lenin and Trotsky; the growth of Bolshevik organisation; the October/November Revolution.
  • The impact of Lenin’s dictatorship: the end of the First World War; the Cheka; the Red Army; causes, nature and consequences of the Civil War and Bolshevik success; propaganda.
  • Social and economic developments: War Communism; the Kronstadt Rising; the New Economic Policy (NEP); the achievements of Lenin and Trotsky.

Part Three: Stalin’s USSR

  • Stalin the dictator: the power struggle to succeed Lenin; the control of the Communist part over government; the Terror and the Purges; the army; secret police; labour camps; censorship; the cult of personality; propaganda.
  • Stalin’s modernisation of the USSR: collectivisation; the Five Year Plans; social and economic consequences for Kulaks, city dwellers, women, professional and industrial workers; the extent of modernisation.
  • Impact of the Second World War: Stalin’s wartime leadership; political, economic and social problems caused by the Great Patriotic War up to 1945.

Spring/Summer Term

Section B: Conflict and Tension between East and West, 1945-1972

This wider world depth study enables you to understand the complex and diverse interests of different states and individuals and the ideologies they represented. It considers revolutionary movements during this time. It focuses on the causes and events of the Cold War and seeks to show how and why conflict occurred and why it proved difficult to resolve the tensions which arose during the Cold War. This study also considers the role of key individuals and groups in shaping change and how they were affected by and influenced international relations.

Part One: The Origins of the Cold War

  • The end of the Second World War: Yalta and Potsdam Conferences; the division of Germany; contrasting attitudes and ideologies of the USA and the USSR, including the aims of Stalin, Churchill, Roosevelt, Attlee and Truman; effect of the dropping of the atom bomb on post-war superpower relations.
  • The Iron Curtain and the evolution of East-West rivalry: Soviet expansion in East Europe; US policies; the Truman Doctrine and Marshall Plan, their purpose and Stalin’s reaction; Cominform; Comecon; Yugoslavia; the Berlin Blockade and Airlift.

Part Two: The Development of the Cold War

  • The significance of events in Asia for superpower relations: USSR’s support for Mao Tse-tung and Communist revolution in China, and the military campaigns waged by North Korea against the UN and by the Vietcong against France and the USA.
  • Military rivalries: the arms race; membership and purposes of NATO and the Warsaw Pact; the space race, including Sputnik, ICBMs, Polaris, Gagarin, Apollo.
  • The ‘Thaw’: Hungary, the protest movement and the reforms of Nagy; Soviet fears, how they reacted and the effects on the Cold War; the U2 Crisis and its effects on the Paris Peace Summit and the peace process.

Part Three: Transformation of the Cold War

  • Berlin Wall: reasons for its construction and Kennedy’s response.
  • Tensions over Cuba: Castro’s revolution, the Bay of Pigs and the missile crisis: the roles of Castro, Khrushchev, Kennedy; fears of the USA and reaction to missiles on Cuba; dangers and results of crisis.
  • Czechoslovakia: Dubeck and the Prague Spring movement; USSR’s response to the reforms; the effects the Prague Spring had on East-West relations, including the Warsaw Pact; the Brezhnev Doctrine.
  • Easing of tension: sources of tension, including the Soviets’ record on human rights; the reasons for Détente and for SALT 1; the part played by key individuals Brezhnev and Nixon.

Autumn Term

Half Term 1

  • Cambridge Latin Course Book 2a – Romans in Britain. Changing lifestyle and fashions; attitudes to an invading culture; grammar and vocabulary foundation for GCSE.

Half Term 2

  • Cambridge Latin Course Book 2b – Alexandria. The cultures of Rome, Greece and Egypt meet and mingle, sometimes with explosive consequences.

Spring Term

Half Term 3

  • Myths, legends and historical passages including:
    • The Trojan War: Greeks besiege the Romans to claim back the world’s most beautiful woman
    • Romulus and Remus: brother kills brother before founding the city of Rome
    • Julius Caesar’s assassination: a general and politician becomes successful – too successful – and is murdered by his own government

Half Term 4

  • Grammar continues to be studied using legends and histories.
  • Vocabulary drawn from GCSE prescribed list to equip pupils for future assessment.
  • Basic aspects of writing in Latin incorporated to provide fuller understanding of grammar.

Summer Term

Half Term 5

  • Myth and history form basis for grammar – materials taken from equivalent of GCSE foundation tier.
  • Source work introduced, chosen from a variety of topics – religion, entertainment, military life etc.

Half Term 6

  • Source work continues
  • Prescribed Literature introduced for GCSE

Autumn Term

Pupils will be assessed throughout the term with small assessments, homeworks and tests in assessment weeks.

The foundation classes will cover:
Sequences and proof, trial and improvement, coordinates and linear graphs, quadratics and other non linear graphs, ratio and proportion, angles and measurement (estimation and using scales)

The higher classes will cover:
Equations of circles, direct proportion, inverse proportion, quadratic simultaneous equations, algebraic fractions, trail and improvement, angles, triangles, polygons, construction, compound shapes and 3D objects.

Spring Term

The foundation classes will cover:
Using different units, triangles, constructions, applied algebra within shapes, perimeter, area, volume, circles and cylinders.

The higher classes will cover:
Enlargement, circles, cylinders, cones and spheres, dimensional analysis, gradients, area under a curve, transformations, congruency and similarity.

Summer Term

The pupils will sit a cumulative exam at the end of Year 10. Students will do a problem solving week at the end of Year 10.

The foundation classes will cover:
All transformations, Vectors, congruency and similarity, speed, distance and time and density.

The higher classes will cover:
Constructions, loci, Pythagoras, trigonometry, trigonometric graphs, the sine rule, the cosine rule, circle theorems and transforming graphs.

Autumn Term

Students are introduced to their first set piece by Handel. They study the background and stylistic characteristics of this period and compose a short piece in pairs using these traits. Assessment on the period occurs after 6 weeks. During the first half-term they practise a short solo piece for performance in class. They start the second piece by Mozart around week 7, and study the classical period, its background and style. They compose a second short composition in a minor key as a response. An assessment on Mozart follows. The third piece Rag Desh is started towards the end of November. Indian instruments are investigated as are notes of ragas and their construction and they improvise some music.

Spring Term

Students start with revision and then a test on Rag Desh. They then begin a section on blues and jazz creating music in response to the set piece by Miles Davis. An assessment on this follows. They also choose and start to rehearse an ensemble piece (which may feature in a concert at the end of the summer term). The 5th set piece by Chopin and the romantic period is now studied. Chromatic chords and pedal notes are investigated and a piano composition is started. An assessment on this piece finishes the term along with performances of the ensemble pieces chosen.

Summer Term

Students start the term with an introduction to African music and through improvisation they invent a piece similar to the 6th set piece by Koko. After an assessment a series of revision lessons on each set piece of the year takes place. Solo performances are heard again. Mid way through the second half term a mock listening exam takes place, giving students a taste of the final standard necessary for the real exam. The last few weeks of the year are devoted to finishing the first draft of their first proper composition for GCSE and a concert to friends and family in the Winter Gardens.

Autumn Term

  • Component 1: Exploring the Performing Arts (30%)
  • Component 2: Developing Skills and Techniques in Performing Arts (30%)

We have three specialist teachers for the three areas (dance, drama, singing – which we call the 3 disciplines). The first two units are taught together so that students can combine personal skill development (Component 2) with analysis of professional works (Component 2). We use Sweet Charity, Billy Elliot and West Side Story musicals for close study, including learning extracts from those for the students to perform.

Students begin the course by evaluating their current skills in drama, dance and singing. During the first year of the course they set targets for improvement and take part in workshops designed to build those skills. These workshops culminate in a performance combining all three areas. During this autumn term they will have base line assessments so they we and they can monitor their progress. These are arranged by their separate teachers across the 3 disciplines.

After autumn half term the students will be given their logbooks and research journals which will be ongoing work throughout the first year. The early stages of this component will involve whole class exploration and research. This will involve self-evaluation and target setting for Component 2, and research data gathering for Component 1. Students have to organise their work so that the online journal and logbook can be worked on at home as well as at school. This will either involve cloud storage or careful use of a memory stick.

The Billy Elliot research journal will be completed by the end of term.

Spring Term

Students will continue to develop personal performance skills, recording progress in their logbook, as well as performing extracts from the three musicals. By this stage students will have learnt how the different professionals work individually and together to create a variety of works, but importantly they will continue to explore these works – and others – in a practical manner. Towards the end of the term students will take part in a formal assessed performance of extracts from their set musicals.

The Sweet Charity research journal will be completed by February half term.

Summer Term

The West Side Story research journal will be completed two weeks after Easter. Students continue with Components 1 and 2, with a final hand-in of their written work by May half term.

Students then need to prepare for a presentation to staff on what they have learnt about the processes in musical theatres, using evidence from their research journals, as well as video evidence of professional shows. They will be guided in preparation for this.

Presentations happen in early July.

Autumn Term

As part of the Core PE Programme students will complete units of work in the following activities, building on the skills and knowledge developed as part of the Year 9 programme:

Girls

  • Cross Country
  • Netball
  • Trampolining
  • Fitness
  • Hockey
  • Badminton

Boys

  • Cross Country
  • Rugby
  • Hockey
  • Football
  • Trampolining

In these activities students will continue to develop their knowledge and understanding of the rules of the activity, as well as working to extend and develop their level of skill and tactical game play. Students will continue to develop their leadership skills from Year 9, taking a variety of roles within the lesson. Students will complete an internal assessment at the end of each unit of work.

Spring Term

As part of the Core PE Programme students will complete units of work in the following activities:

Girls

  • Exercise to Music
  • Rugby
  • Football
  • Orienteering

Boys

  • Badminton
  • Fitness
  • Basketball
  • Long Ball
  • Orienteering

In these activities students will continue to develop their knowledge and understanding of the rules of the activity, as well as working to extend and develop their level of skill and tactical game play. Students will complete an internal assessment at the end of each unit of work.

Summer Term

As part of the Core PE Programme students will complete units of work in the following activities:

Girls

  • Rounders
  • Tennis
  • Volleyball
  • Athletics

Boys

  • Tennis
  • Volleyball
  • Athletics
  • Cricket

In these activities students will continue to develop their knowledge and understanding of the rules of the activity, as well as working to extend and develop their level of skill and tactical game play. Students will complete an internal assessment at the end of each unit of work.

There are four units at GCSE level: B451 and B452 completed in Year One (Y10), B453 and B454 completed in Year Two (Y11).

  • B451 – Introduction to PE (exam – 20%)
  • B452 – Practical Performance (two sports – 20%) and Analysing Lifestyle (Controlled Assessment – 10%)
  • B453 – Developing Knowledge in PE (exam – 20%)
  • B454 – Practical Performance (two sports – 20%) and Analysing Performance (Controlled Assessment – 10%)

Autumn Term

Students will develop their knowledge and understanding of the introductory topics to GCSE PE.

B451 – Introduction to Physical Education

  1. Key concepts in Physical Education
  2. Key processes in Physical Education
  • Developing skills and techniques
  • Decision Making
  • Physical and Mental Capacity
  • Evaluating and Improving
  • Making informed choices about healthy, active lifestyles
  • Reasons for non-participation (negative)

Assessment weeks: w/c 28 September and w/c 30 November.

Internal assessments: past paper questions

Spring Term

Students will evaluate opportunities, pathways and participation in Physical Education and discuss levels of participation in sport and physical activity. They will also study reasons for participation (positive).

Students will also study:

  • Specific social, cultural and locational reasons affecting participation
  • School influences on participation
  • Identification and description of pathways for involvement in physical activity

Assessment week: w/c 18 April

Internal Assessments

Summer Term

Students study the B452 Controlled Assessment – Analysing Lifestyle task worth 10% of the final GCSE grade.

Throughout the year students will complete units of work in a range of practical sports and be assessed in these activities.

Assessments: Controlled Assessment B452, Practical Sports Moderation

Autumn Term

Students will learn about the particle model of solids, liquids and gases. They will then move on to the topic of electricity, including electric circuits and mains electricity.

Spring Term

Students will continue their study of electricity. They will then move on to the topic of forces.

Summer Term

Students will continue their study of forces until the end of term. This topic includes vectors, Newton’s Laws of Motion, speed, velocity and acceleration.

[Y10 PSHE content]

Overview

The GCSE has 2 components:

Component 1: The in-depth study of key beliefs and practices in Christianity and Islam.

Component 2: The study of four moral issues from religious perspectives:

  • Relationships and families
  • Religion and life
  • Crime and punishment
  • War and peace

Students are required to show the ability to give detailed explanations of religious beliefs, practices and attitudes and to evaluate those attitudes to form their own justified viewpoints.

Year 10: Autumn Term

Week 1–3: Christian Beliefs part 1

Week 4–8: Relationships and Families [Christianity and Hinduism]

Week 9–15: Christian Practices

Spring Term

Religion and Life [Christianity and Hinduism]

Christian Beliefs part 2

Summer Term

Week 6–7: Revision

Week 8–9: Year 10 exam plus feedback/follow-up

Week 10–13: Muslim Practices part 1

In Year 10, German and Spanish cover aspects within the following topic headings plus grammar, though in a different order according to each language:

  • Me, my family and friends
  • Home, town, neighbourhood and region
  • My studies
  • Free time
  • Healthy eating
  • Life at school
  • Customs and festivals
  • Travel and tourism
  • Education post-16

There are no internal assessments other than calendared assessment weeks, and there is no controlled assessment.

In Year 10, Sport students will complete two units of work:

Unit R041: Reducing the Risk of Sports Injuries – assessed via external exam

Unit R042: Applying Principles of Training – assessed via coursework

Autumn Term

Students will start the OCR Sport Course by starting Unit R042: Applying Principles of Training. Students will develop a range of study skills in order to produce coursework for internal assessment. Students are assessed throughout the course via different methods of assessment including:

  • Presentations
  • Reports
  • Factsheets
  • Practical Analysis
  • Posters
  • Leaflets
  • Role play scenarios

Unit R042: Applying Principals of Training

  • The principles of training
  • Training methods
  • Fitness tests
  • Developing a fitness training programme

Spring Term

Students will complete Unit R042 in the Spring Term and will then build knowledge for an external exam in the Summer Term. The examined unit R041: Reducing the Risk of Sports Injuries includes the following:

  • Understand different factors which influence the risk of injury
  • Understand how appropriate warm up and cool down routines can help to prevent injury
  • Know how to respond to injuries within a sporting context
  • Know how to respond to common medical conditions

Summer Term

Students will complete Unit R041 and prepare for the final external exam assessment in the summer term.

External Moderation – June

Autumn Term

Students will develop their skill set by learning a range of new textiles techniques and processes under the title assignment of ‘Embellishment’. They will work in a small sketchbook and learn techniques such as Batik, print, transfers and many more.

Spring Term

Students will complete a final garment for their ‘Embellishment’ assignment showing off the skills they have gained in the first part of the course.

Summer Term

Students will start a second assignment entitled ‘Sea Life’ building upon already learnt skills and respond personally to the subject matter allowing for more diversity and personal style. They will study the work of other artists and designers and evaluate their own practical responses.