The sections below detail the curriculum for Year 12 students at QEHS.

Please use the following guide to help you decide the appropriate point of contact for any curriculum-related issues:

Nature of EnquiryContactPhone/Email
General questions about your child's work, progress, or homeworkSubject teachersBy note via your child or by contacting the main switchboard on 01434 610300
A concern about your child's progress or experience in a particular subjectCurriculum/Subject Leaders (see Meet Our Staff)Contact the main switchboard on 01434 610300
General enquiries related to the curriculum, options, higher education applications or complex academic issues involving more than one subjectThe Curriculum TeamTelephone the Curriculum Office on 01434 610312 or email curriculum@qehs.net
Other matters not listed aboveReceptionPlease phone 01434 610300 and we will direct your enquiry to the appropriate person

Autumn Term

Unit 2: Practical Scientific Procedures and Techniques

Students will be taught the necessary skills and techniques for the practical tasks in this unit and will then have the opportunity to use them to complete their work. This is an internally assessed portfolio of work. It is comprised of four assignments, three of which have a practical element. Students will complete assignments on titrations and colorimetry, calorimetry and chromatography. They will then be expected to write a report giving details of each of the practical takes they have been set. This unit is worth a quarter of the overall qualification.

Spring Term and Summer Term

Unit 1: Principles and Applications of Science I

This is an externally assessed unit. It will have a 90-minute exam in June of Year 12. The exam is split into three equal parts with the biology, chemistry and physics each accounting for 30 marks. Students can expect to study topics relating to cells in biology, the properties of the elements in the periodic table in chemistry and waves in physics. This unit is worth a quarter of the overall qualification.

Autumn Term

With one of their teachers students will be learning about the structure of eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells. They will develop their skills in observing cells using the light microscope and using mathematical techniques to determine the size and magnification of the cells. Students will learn the theory behind other techniques such as differential centrifugation and the use of electron microscopes. Students will also develop their understanding of mitosis and the link to cancer. Cell transport will also be covered.

With their other teacher students will be studying biological molecules including carbohydrates, proteins, fats and DNA. They will continue their studies into enzymes and also investigate methods of DNA replication.

Required practicals – 1, 2 and 3

Assessment – Written test during assessment week and required practicals for the practical endorsement.

Autumn –Summer Term

Unit 1 Exploring Business

In this introductory unit, learners study the purposes of different businesses, their structure, the effect of the external environment, and how they need to be dynamic and innovative to survive. Students will gain an overview of the key ingredients for business success, how businesses are organised, how they communicate, the characteristics of the environment in which they operate, and how this shapes them and their activities. Students will also look at the importance of innovation and enterprise to the success and survival of businesses, with the associated risks and benefits.

Assessment: This unit is assessed by three unit assignments and marked internally.

Unit 2 Developing a Marketing Campaign

Learners will gain skills relating to, and an understanding of, how a marketing campaign is developed. Marketing is a dynamic field central to the success of any business. Students will gain an understanding of how a marketing campaign is developed. They will also explore different stages of the process that a business goes through when developing its campaign and develop their own campaign for a given product/service..

Assessment: This unit is assessed under supervised conditions. Part A is released two weeks before Part B is scheduled for learners to carry out research. Part B is a supervised assessment of three hours taken in a single session during the two-day period timetabled by Pearson. The assessment is set and marked by Pearson. The number of marks for the unit is 70.

Autumn Term

Students study two units:

Elements for Life

The Big Bang theory is used to introduce the question of where the elements come from. This leads to discussion of the concepts of atomic structure, nuclear fusion, and the use of mass spectroscopy to determine the relative abundance of isotopes. Next, looking at how we study the radiation we receive from outer space provides the context for discussion of atomic spectroscopy and electronic structure. A historical approach is then used to introduce the periodic table, including the links between electronic structure and physical properties. This is followed by studying some of the molecules found in space, providing the context for introducing bonding and structure and the shapes of molecules. The storyline then turns to chemistry found closer to home. Ideas about the elements found in the human body and their relative amounts are used to introduce the concept of amount of substance and related calculations. The bodily fluids blood and salt then provide a basis for studying salts; this context also incorporates sea water and uses of salts such as in bath salts, lithium batteries, barium meals, hand warmers and fertilisers. This also provides the context for discussing the chemistry of Group 2 elements, as well as amount of substance calculations involving concentration and acid–base titrations.

The chemical ideas in this module are:

  • Atomic structure, atomic spectra and electron configurations
  • Fusion reactions
  • Mass spectroscopy and isotopes
  • The periodic table and Group 2 chemistry
  • Bonding and the shapes of molecules
  • Chemical equations and amount of substance (moles)
  • Ions: formulae, charge density, tests
  • Titrations and titration calculations

Developing Fuels

The use of fuels in cars provides the main context in this storyline, and is used to initially introduce the basic concept of enthalpy change. Food as ‘fuel’ for the body is then an alternative context in which to discuss quantitative aspects of enthalpy, including practical techniques and enthalpy cycles. The storyline returns to the constituents of car fuels to introduce hydrocarbons and bond enthalpy, after which cracking provides the background to how petrol is produced. Alkenes are then introduced in the context of saturated and unsaturated fats found in foods. This is followed by studying the polymerisation of alkenes in the context of synthetic polymers and their uses. The storyline returns to car fuels to discuss combustion reactions and amount of substance calculations involving gases, shapes of hydrocarbons and isomerism, and the atmospheric pollutants produced in burning fuels. The storyline ends by considering the contribution of hydrogen and biofuels as potential fuels of the future.

The chemical ideas in this module are:

  • Thermochemistry
  • Organic chemistry: names and combustion of alkanes, alkenes, alcohols
  • Heterogeneous catalysis
  • Reactions of alkenes
  • Addition polymers
  • Electrophilic addition
  • Gas volume calculations
  • Shapes of organic molecules, σ- and π-bonds
  • Structural and E/Z isomers
  • Dealing with polluting gases

Spring Term

Students study two further units.

Elements from the Sea

The presence of halide salts in the sea provides the entry to the properties of the halogens and reactions between halide ions. The manufacture of bromine and chlorine then provide the context for discussion of redox chemistry, electrolysis and the nomenclature of inorganic compounds. The use of chlorine in bleach is used to introduce the concept of equilibrium and calculations of the equilibrium constant, as well as iodine–thiosulfate titrations. This leads into a discussion of the risks and benefits of using chlorine. Finally, atom economy is introduced through the manufacture of hydrogen chloride and other hydrogen halides. The Deacon process for making HCl provides an opportunity to expand on ideas relating to the position of equilibrium.

The chemical ideas in this teaching module are:

  • Halogen chemistry
  • Redox chemistry and electrolysis
  • Equilibrium
  • Atom economy

The Ozone Story

An initial study of the composition of the atmosphere provides the opportunity to introduce composition by volume calculations for gases. Discussion of ozone‘s role as a ‘sunscreen’ then leads to ideas of the principal types of electromagnetic radiation and their effects on molecules. This introduces a study of radical reactions, reaction kinetics and catalysis, set in the context of the ways in which ozone is made and destroyed in the atmosphere. A consideration of CFCs and HFCs then provides the introduction to the chemistry of haloalkanes, including nucleophilic substitution, and intermolecular bonding.

The chemical ideas in this module are:

  • Composition by volume of gases
  • The electromagnetic spectrum and the interaction of radiation with matter
  • Rates of reaction
  • Radical reactions
  • Intermolecular bonding
  • Haloalkanes
  • Nucleophilic substitution reactions
  • The sustainability of the ozone layer

Summer Term

Students finish The Ozone Story and study one more topic.

What’s in a Medicine?

A consideration of medicines from nature focuses on aspirin. The chemistry of the –OH group is introduced through reactions of salicin and salicylic acid, beginning with alcohols and continuing with phenols. The discussion of chemical tests for alcohols and phenols leads to the introduction of IR and mass spectrometry as more powerful methods for identifying substances. The storyline concludes by examining the synthesis of aspirin to illustrate organic preparative techniques, including a look at the principles of green chemistry.

The chemical ideas in this module are:

  • The chemistry of the –OH group, phenols and alcohols
  • Carboxylic acids and esters
  • Mass spectroscopy and IR spectroscopy
  • Organic synthesis, preparative techniques and thin layer chromatography
  • Green chemistry

Autumn Term

Half Term 1 (September – October)

Unit 1: The Odyssey

  • Introduction to oral poetry, and the historical and cultural context of Homer’s Odyssey.
  • The Mycenaeans: Bronze Age warriors and kings.
  • Books 1-4 of the Odyssey: a son searches for his father.
  • The characterisation of the Suitors.

Unit 2: Roman History

  • Introduction to Roman society and politics.
  • Historical background – Augustus’ rise to power, the battle of Actium.
  • Using primary sources from history.
  • Focus on sources – Augustus in his own words (was he as popular as he tells us?)
  • Horace – happy to praise the ruler.

Half Term 2 (November – December)

Unit 1: The Odyssey

  • The Adventure Books: Gods and Monsters, Books 5-11.
  • Calypso, the Cyclops, Aeolus and the bag of winds, Circe and descent to the Underworld.
  • Fantasy and realism in the Odyssey.
  • Analysis of the concept of a hero, and consideration of Odysseus’ leadership qualities.

Unit 2: Roman History

  • Three Roman historians dish the dirt about the emperors: Suetonius, Tacitus, Velleius Paterculus. How accurate are their accounts of Augustus?

Spring Term

Half Term 3 (January – February)

Unit 1: The Odyssey

  • Study of Books 12-17.
  • Odysseus loses his men, yet returns to Ithaca.
  • Disguise as a beggar and loss of identity.
  • The importance of Xenia to Homeric society.
  • Group ICT presentations on individual books and themes.

Unit 2 Roman History

  • The propaganda poets – Virgil and Propertius build up the legend of Augustus.

Half Term 4 (March – April)

Unit 1: The Odyssey

  • Study of Books 18-24: Banquets and Slaughter.
  • An analysis of the motif of light as a symbol for the return of the King.
  • The Lapiths and Centaurs: a legendary struggle.
  • The role and presentation of women in Homeric society.
  • The development of the character and confidence of Telemachus.
  • Husband and wife re-united.

Unit 2: Roman History

  • Balancing the picture – sources from various writers give accounts of unrest, unpopularity and attempted assassination.
  • Strabo, Macrobius, Seneca the Younger and others complete our knowledge.

Summer Term

Half Term 5 (May – June)

Unit 1: The Odyssey

  • Thematic overview and exam preparation with practice questions
  • May assessment: 1 hour 30 minutes

Unit 2: Roman History

  • Thematic overview of the course
  • Exam preparation
  • May assessment: 1 hour 30 minutes

To complete the course, students will need to study two units in which they will learn skills for the planning of media productions and essential communication skills for the media industry. Students develop an understanding of the media industry through analysing media representations and pitching and producing media projects. The two units students will study in Year 12 are:

  • Unit 01: Media Representation
  • Unit 04: Pre-Production Portfolio

On all BTEC Level 3 National courses, the majority of learning is practical and vocationally focused to develop the skills needed for a media career. They also convert to UCAS points, just like A Levels, but the way students are assessed and graded is slightly different. The BTEC National L3 Extended Certificate in Creative Digital Media Production is equivalent to one A Level.

Autumn Term

Term 1 (September – December)

Unit 04: Pre-Production Portfolio

  • Course introduction and study skills
  • Introduction to practical work
  • Understand the requirements of pre-production of a digital media product
  • Carry out pre-production for a digital media product
  • Produce a pre-production portfolio for a creative media production
  • Review pre-production of a digital media product

Term 2 (January – May)

Unit 01: Media Representation

  • Course introduction
  • Apply knowledge and understanding of media concepts, semiotics, theories and formal techniques to constructed representations
  • Analyse media texts to deconstruct representations and decode messages and evaluate their effectiveness and impact
  • Make connections between polysemic messages underpinning media representations and their related values and effects on wider society

[Product Design content]

Autumn Term

Component 1: Devising 40%

Students begin the course by learning about Brechtian theatre skills and Epic Theatre, which they will go on to use in all elements of this component. This will involve a series of workshops, culminating in a piece of theatre devised by the group to demonstrate their knowledge and understanding of the techniques they’ve used.

After autumn half term the students will be given their stimulus material and their final Component 1 groups. The early stages of this component will involve whole class exploration and research, and as the groups are formed students will take on responsibility for their progress and area of interest. This will involve self-evaluation and compromise as well as a real creative and practical challenge. The assessment includes a portfolio which can be either written or recorded, which will document their process and evaluate the success of the final performance piece.

Extra rehearsals at lunchtimes and after school are strongly recommended. Rooms can be booked in advance through the department.

Spring Term

Component 1: Devising (40%)

Students will continue to work in their groups to refine and rehearse their devised performances. Work on the portfolios will continue during lessons and for homework.

Component 3: Written Exam (40%)

We will arrange a theatre visit for students so that they can complete a mock evaluation in preparation for their Component 3 exam.

Summer Term

Component 1: Devising (40%)

Students will perform their devised plays and complete the first draft of their portfolios. This will conclude the class time on Component 1. This work is internally marked by the drama teachers in the department and will be moderated later in the year by an external moderator.

Component 2: Performing Exam (20%)

Students will begin preparation for their performance exam. This will involve being allocated a new group and a scripted play to study. Students will also need to begin the process of choosing their monologue or duologue.

Component 3: Written Exam (40%)

Students will begin preparatory work on the set texts, Woyzeck by Georg Buchner and Colder Than Here by Laura Wade. This will involve reading the plays and practical workshops.

A Level Economics: Edexcel – 8EC0

There are two themes studied in Year 12. There is no coursework and no external examination in Year 12. Two further themes are studied in Year 13 which build on the themes detailed below. Three external examinations are taken at the end of the second year of study.

Suggested course reading list:

  • Edexcel AS/A Level Economics Student Book. Publisher: Pearson. ISBN: 9781447990550
  • Economic Review (subscription magazine) ISBN: 7981471891434

Autumn Term

Theme 1: Introduction to Markets and Market Failure

  • Course introduction and study skills
  • Economics as a social science
  • The basic economic problem
  • Production possibility curves
  • Division of labour and specialisation
  • Positive and normative statements
  • What is microeconomics?
  • Demand
  • Supply
  • Price determination using market diagrams
  • Elasticity
  • Consumer and producer surplus
  • Indirect taxes and subsidies
  • Types of economic system
  • Economic theorists
  • Efficiency
  • Introduction to market failure
  • Merit and De-merit goods
  • Public Goods
  • Information theory

Spring Term

Theme 2: The UK Economy – Performance and Policies

  • What is macroeconomics?
  • Measures of economic performance: inflation, economic growth
  • Measures of economic performance: employment, balance of payments
  • Aggregate demand
  • Aggregate supply
  • National income & multiplier effect
  • Macroeconomic equilibrium
  • Economic growth: causes, output gaps and impacts of
  • The economic cycle Economic growth: limitations of and happiness survey
  • Macroeconomic objectives
  • Demand side policies
  • Supply side policies

Summer Term

Theme 1: Introduction to Markets and Market Failure

  • Market failure continued
  • Government failure
  • Revision and exam technique
  • Preparation for exam

Theme 2: The UK Economy – Performance and Policies

  • Macroeconomic objectives and conflicts
  • Revision and exam technique
  • Preparation for exam

Autumn Term

Love Through the Ages

Students will be studying towards an examined unit of work exploring depictions of love through the ages. They will be encouraged to read widely and independently around this topic, and look at contextual and historical details, critical interpretation and close analysis. Students will need to develop and practise close reading skills across the three texts they will be studying, including two unseen poems. Students will also be expected to identify and critically analyse how attitudes and values are communicated throughout the studied texts. Texts in the first term will include Othello by Shakespeare, and Wuthering Heights by Emily Brontë. Wider knowledge of other Shakespeare plays and their reception, and well as knowledge of Romanticism and the portrayal of gender and power throughout literary history will be required for the examination. Students will also be required to make connections with the unseen poetry.

Assessment: Othello extract analysis

Spring Term

Love through the ages continued

Non-exam assessment: Texts across Time

Students will continue studying Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte; Othello by William Shakespeare; and an anthology of pre-1900 love poetry. They will also look at a range of poetry and develop their analytical skills when approaching unseen texts.

The aim of the internally assessed component is to encourage individual study, interest and enjoyment of modern literature and for students to develop:

  • An appreciation of how writers shape meanings in texts through use of language, imagery, form and structure
  • An understanding of texts informed by an appreciation of different interpretations
  • An ability to explore connections across texts, such as stylistic, thematic or contextual

Specific ideas for internally assessed coursework will be confirmed thorough individual tutorials and it will be our intention that no two pieces of coursework be the same. One text must be pre-1900, and should be 2500 words with a bibliography.

Assessment: Wuthering Heights and poetry comparison

Summer Term

Texts in Shared Context

As with the autumn term, this will be an examined component, and students will study three texts – one prose, one poetry text and one drama. One of these texts must be post-2000, and therefore a recent text.

Students will take a ‘new historicist’ approach to exploring this period through literature, examining both contextual detail and literary texts. As with the autumn and spring term, students must gain confidence with close reading skills looking at narrative voice, characterisation and narrative structure. In addition, students must bring in ideas of drama and staging appropriate to the study of a play, and similarly to the first term, students must explore attitudes and viewpoints surrounding this difficult subject matter.

Texts in shared context will be taught alongside independent study, as will unseen poetry.

Autumn Term

In Year 12 pupils do three modules: Further Pure 1, Decision 1 and Statistics 2. In this first term we will be teaching Decision 1 and Further Pure 1 simultaneously. Pupils will do short topic tests. Tests will be made up of previous exam questions.

Decision 1 topics: Algorithms, graphs and networks, minimum connector problems, Dijkstra’s Algorithm, the Chinese Postman Problem, the Travelling Salesperson Problem, linear programming and the Simplex Algorithm.

Further Pure 1 topics: Sums of series, roots of polynomials and complex numbers.

Spring Term

In this term we will continue with Further Pure 1 and move onto Statistics 2. Pupils will do mock a full Decision 1 paper and half a Further Pure 1 paper for their mocks. Our aim is to finish the course by Easter.

Further Pure 1 topics: Matrices and proof by induction.

Statistics 2 topics: Sampling, significance testing, Poisson distribution, normal distribution and probability density functions.

Summer Term

After Easter pupils will be revising by recovering topics in class.

After the exams pupils will start their Year 13 modules. Pupils will study Further Pure 2, Further Pure 3 and Mechanics 2 in Year 13.

Year one of a two-year linear A Level (AQA GCE Art and Design – Fine Art)

Autumn Term

Students will develop their skills through observational drawing, technique building and printmaking inspired by natural forms.

Spring Term

Students will focus and expand their investigations and explorations towards a more individual thematic enquiry around the title ‘Elements’. They will develop their understanding of sketchbook processes via contextual studies and responding to the work of artists and designers.

Summer Term

Extended development work in which they will realise their intentions in the form of a final outcome or final outcomes.

In the second half of the term students will begin their formal Unit 1 work which will contribute to their assessed portfolio in Year 13. This will be a Personal Investigation project with students deciding the theme.

Autumn Term

  • Lifestyle, health and fitness
  • The world around us
  • Grammar programme

Spring Term

  • Youth culture and concerns
  • Education and employment
  • Grammar programme
  • Mock exams

Summer Term

  • Examination preparation
  • Past papers

Autumn Term

Students have two different teachers. One will cover Unit 1 and the other will cover Unit 2:

  • Unit 1 – Topic 1: Tectonic Processes and Hazards
  • Unit 2 – Topic 3: Globalisation

Spring Term

  • Unit 1 – Topic 2: Landscape Systems, Processes and Change –2B Coastal Landscapes and Change
  • Unit 2 – Topic 4: Shaping Places – 4A Regenerating Places

Summer Term

Students will complete the topics started in the Spring term and will then take part in a residential fieldwork to Lytham St Annes where they will either conduct an individual dune investigation or regeneration study in Blackpool. When they return, they will spend class time writing up their individual investigations before starting the Year 2 topics Superpowers and The Water Cycle and Water Insecurity.

Year one of a two-year linear A Level (AQA GCE Art and Design – Graphic Communication)

Autumn Term

Students will go back to the basics of graphics and fine tune their existing skills whilst getting to grips with the fundamentals of the subject. They will present their findings in a ‘Fanzine’ with a page dedicated to: typography, collage, symbols and logos, packaging, photo and image manipulation and finally illustration.

Spring Term

Students will branch out from their original studies conducted through the ‘Fanzine’ and choose which area to study further. They will be given six briefs and asked to develop their own ideas based on these. Students will focus their study around the four assessment objectives ensuring they have completed contextual research, visual research, design development and a final conclusion.

Summer Term

Students will develop a group project building on teamwork skills and developing creativity in the design process. They will learn to present their work as a team to their teachers. Students will then present a final exhibition in early May.

Autumn – Summer Term

BTEC Level 3 National Extended Certificate in Health and Social Care (exam board: Edexcel)

Students will complete two units of work in Year 12:

Unit 1: Human Lifespan Development (externally assessed, written exam: 1 hour 30 minutes)

This unit covers physical, intellectual, emotional and social development across the human lifespan. It will also cover biological, environmental, societal and financial factors affecting development, including the effect of predictable and unpredictable factors, and the psychological and physical effects of aging.

Therefore, this unit has a broad focus, giving learners underpinning knowledge and understanding of potential health and social care needs faced by individuals at different life stages and the factors affecting development and the effects of aging.

Unit 5: Meeting Individual Care and Support Needs (internally assessed, two-part task comprising of research and a written piece)

This unit covers the values and principles of meeting care and support needs and looks at some of the ethical issues that arise when personalising care. Students will examine factors that may impact the professionals who provide the care and support, and the challenges that must be overcome to allow access to good quality care and health services. Students will explore the different methods used by professionals across all care services. They will reflect on these methods when considering the importance of multi-agency working in providing a package of care and support that meets all the needs of individuals.

This unit will be useful to those who are intending to pursue a career in social care or healthcare, for instance, as a social worker or health worker, practice nurse or occupational therapist. The unit will also be invaluable to those who wish to progress to higher education, to degrees in areas such as health and social care management, social work and nursing.

There are two areas examined for this course. The first deals with the emergence and development of the United States of America as a superpower between 1865 and 1975. The second requires a depth study of modern Britain from 1951-2007. Both papers carry equal weighting at the end of Year 13.

Suggested Course reading list:

The Making of a Superpower: The USA 1865-1975, published by Oxford University Press.

The Making of Modern Britain, 1951-2007, published by Oxford University Press.

Further reading guidance can be found in the A Level History student study guide.

Autumn Term

The Making of a Superpower: the USA, 1865-1975 (HIS1K)

An Overview of the America Civil War

  • America before the Civil War
  • Why did the American Civil War break out?
  • Why did the Northerners win the Civil War?
  • What happened in the immediate aftermath of the Civil War?

The Era of Reconstruction and the Gilded Age, 1865–1890

  • The weaknesses of Federal Government: Johnson, Grant and the failure of Radical Reconstruction.
  • The politics of the Gilded Age and the era of weak presidents; political corruption.
  • Social, regional and ethnic divisions: divisions within and between North, South and West; the position of African-Americans.
  • Economic growth and the rise of corporations: railways; oil; developments in agriculture; urbanisation.

The Making of Modern Britain, 1951-2007 (HIS2S)

The Affluent Society, 1951-1964

  • Political and economic change – 13 wasted years?
  • Conservative governments and political dominance: Churchill, Eden, MacMillan and Home as political leaders.
  • Internal labour divisions.
  • Why the Conservatives fell from power.
  • Economic developments: post-war boom; balance of payments issues and ‘stop-go’ policies.

Social Change – You’ve never had it so good?

  • Social developments: rising living standards; the impact of affluence and consumerism; changing social attitudes and tensions; class and ‘the Establishment’; the position of women; attitudes to immigration; racial violence; the emergence of the ‘teenager’ and youth culture.

End of Empire, Suez Crisis and the EEC

  • Foreign relations: EFTA and attempts to join the EEC; relations with the USA and USSR; debates over the nuclear deterrent; Korean War; Suez; the ‘Winds of Change’ and decolonisation.

Spring Term

The Making of a Superpower: the USA, 1865-1975 (HIS1K)

The Era of Reconstruction and the Gilded Age, 1865–1890

  • Laissez-faire dominance and consequences; the impact of the ending of the frontier.
  • The limits of foreign engagement and continuation of isolationism: the continuation of the Monroe Doctrine; territorial consolidation (Alaska) and tensions over Canada.

Populism, Progressivism and Imperialism, 1890–1920

  • Political tensions and divisions: the reaction against Big Business at national and state level.
  • The ideas and influence of Bryan, Roosevelt and Taft; Populism, Progressivism and Wilson’s New Freedom.
  • Economic change and developments: the rise of US dominance as an economic and industrial power and the consequences of this.
  • Social developments: mass immigration and urbanisation and their consequences; the position of African-Americans.

The Making of Modern Britain, 1951-2007 (HIS2S)

The Swinging Sixties, 1964–1970

The Wilson years

  • Wilson and the Labour governments: Wilson’s ideology and leadership; economic policies and problems; devaluation; industrial relations; the trade unions; other domestic policies; Labour divisions; the beginning of the ‘troubles’ in Northern Ireland; the end of post-war consensus; loss of 1970 election. Relations with and policies towards USA, particularly issue of Vietnam; response to world affairs and relations with Europe; decolonisation, ‘withdrawal East of Suez’ and Rhodesia.

The Swinging Sixties

  • Wilson and liberal reforming legislation: private members’ bills and the end of capital punishment; divorce reform; the legalisation of abortion; the legalisation of homosexual relations; educational reform.
  • Social and cultural change: the expansion of the mass media; growth in leisure activities; the impact of scientific developments; the reduction in censorship; progress towards female equality; changes in moral attitudes; youth culture and the ‘permissive society’; anti-Vietnam war riots; issues of immigration and race

Summer Term

The Making of a Superpower: the USA, 1865-1975 (HIS1K)

Populism, Progressivism and Imperialism, 1890–1920

  • Foreign affairs: imperialism; engagement in international affairs; Spain and the Philippines; the Panama Canal; the First World War, neutrality and entry.
  • The USA by 1920: economic power; social and ethnic divisions; political reaction and renewed isolationism.

Introduction of NEA unit (coursework unit)

  • Students will study an overview of seventeenth century Britain before beginning their coursework.

The Making of Modern Britain, 1951-2007 (HIS2S)

The end of Post-War Consensus, 1970–1979

U-turns, the Troubles and the ‘Winter of Discontent’

  • Heath’s government: Heath as leader; political and economic policies; industrial relations and the miners’ strikes; the ‘troubles’ in Northern Ireland, including the Sunningdale Agreement.
  • Labour governments of Wilson and Callaghan: political, economic and industrial problems and policies; problems of Northern Ireland

Gender Politics, Race Relations and into Europe

  • Society in the 1970s: progress of feminism; the Sex Discrimination Act; race and immigration; youth; environmentalism. Britain’s entry into and relations with Europe; the state of the ‘special relationship’ with USA; attitudes to USSR and China

Autumn Term

Students will cover the first internal unit relating to using social media in the business world. They will complete a report on how it can be used and exploited. Using this knowledge, they will plan, execute and evaluate a social media plan to promote a business or activity.

Students will also start the first external unit: creating systems to manage information. This involves learning about relational databases using Microsoft Access. Complexity and depth will increase, working towards the 10-hour practical exam.

Internal Assessment: first coursework assignment for social media (submission approx. December).

Spring Term

Students will continue with their studies for both units of work.

Internal Assessment: final coursework assignment for social media (submission approx. Easter).

External Assessment: May (databases – 10 hours)

Summer Term

Students will move to the second external assessment – Information Technology Systems. This covers a whole range of areas in the IT world – hardware, software, networking, security, data modelling and legislation. Preparing for external assessment in January of Year 13.

Internal Assessment: mid-July.

Autumn Term

In Year 12 pupils do 3 modules; Core 1, Core 2 and Statistics 1. There will be lessons and lectures. In this first term we will be teaching Core 1 and Statistics 1 simultaneously. Pupils will do short topic tests and longer assessments in assessment weeks. Tests will be made up of previous exam questions.

Core 1 topics: Polynomials, quadratics, inequalities, coordinate goniometry, circles, indices, surd and differentiation.

Statistics 1 topics: Probability, discrete random variables, binomial and geometric distributions, representing data, mean, mode and range, mean and standard deviation, correlation and regression, permutations and combinations.

Spring Term

In this term we will finish off Core 1 topics and do mocks for Core 1 and Statistics 1. Then both teachers will teach Core 2. Pupils will do short topic tests for Core 2. Our aim is to finish the course by Easter.

Core 1 topics: Graphs and transformations of graphs.

Core 2 topics: Trigonometry, radians, sine and cosine rule, logs and exponentials, permutations and combinations, binomials, integration, trapezium rule and sequences and series.

Summer Term

After Easter pupils will be revising by recovering topics in class. After the exams pupils will start their Year 13 modules. Pupils will study Core 3, Core 4 and Mechanics 1 in Year 13.

Autumn Term

Students will be introduced to the key skills required for philosophical study including the type and structure of arguments and what makes a strong/weak argument. They will begin study of the two key topics – Theory of Knowledge (theories of perception) and Philosophy of Religion (defining God and arguments for theism).

Spring Term

Students will develop their skills further focusing on the tripartite theory of knowledge, empiricism and rationalism, the problem of evil and religious language.

Towards the end of this term, students will prepare for their Year 12 exam which will form the basis for their overall A Level predicted grade.

Summer Term

The term begins with exam week followed by feedback and follow-up tasks. Students will then complete the remaining study for Unit 1 before beginning Unit 2 topics on moral philosophy and the metaphysics of the mind.

Year one of a two-year linear A Level (AQA GCE Art and Design – Photography)

Autumn Term

Students will be introduced to an overall theme for them to explore photography through set photo shoot assignments. They will build up their knowledge base including the key concepts needed to handle a digital DSLR: film speed, aperture, shutter speed, lenses, depth of field, focus, and vantage point. Students will also work on improving their skills in digital processes, including how to store, edit and transfer digital files. We will introduce and challenge students to extend their knowledge of Lightshop and Photoshop software and digital editing, digital collage, and digital printing.

Students will also be introduced into the art of darkroom or ‘analogue’ photography. They will use 35mm film in traditional film cameras and learn to process and print from the negatives. They will also experiment with paper negatives and Photograms.

Students will learn to record their work in paper or digital sketchbooks.

Spring Term

A second development project will allow students to make choices to pursue a technique or subject matter of their choice guided by outline briefs and support from teachers. The focus will be on experimentation, encouraging students to push their use of digital editing, combining photography with other media and advancing skills in the darkroom. This project will have staged deadlines to encourage students to work independently to develop their own approaches.

Summer Term

Students will develop a final presentation or final piece as a continuation of their work from the development projects. Students will be introduced to a variety of presentation possibilities, from wall mounted exhibitions, to photo installation, digital projection, collage or a more formal handmade book. This final presentation will have a hard deadline at the end of the half term and will be assessed as a guide to future performance in Year 13. There will also be opportunities to submit work for external competitions and exhibitions.

In the second half of the term students will begin their formal Unit 1 work which will contribute to their assessed portfolio in Year 13. This will be a Personal Investigation project with students deciding the theme.

There are two units in Year 12:

Unit G451: An Introduction to Physical Education (60% of the AS unit and will count as 30% of the A2 grade)

  • Anatomy & Physiology [Section A]
  • Acquiring movement skills [Section B]
  • Socio-Cultural Studies relating to participation in physical activity [Section C]

Unit G452: Acquiring, Developing and Evaluating Practical Skills in Physical Education (40% of the AS unit and will count as 20% of the A2 grade)

  • Practical performance in two practical activities or performance in one activity and either officiating or coaching in another
  • Evaluation of an external Individual Performance in one of your chosen practical activities

Autumn Term

Teacher 1: Anatomy & Physiology

  • Joints: movements; muscles
  • The role of muscular contraction
  • Movement analysis of physical activity
  • Muscle fibre types in relation to choice of physical activity
  • Warm up/cool-down
  • Impact of different types of physical activity on the skeletal and muscular systems
  • Basic concepts of Biomechanics

Teacher 2: Acquiring movement skills

  • Classification of abilities
  • Definition & Characteristics of Motor Skills
  • Classification of Skilful Performance 
  • Organisation of Skill & practice
  • Phases/stages of movement skill learning that affect participation and performance in physical activity
  • Types of guidance and their impact on effective performance and participation in a balanced, active and healthy lifestyle
  • Practice methods & their impact on effective and efficient performance of movement skills
  • Transfer of learning to develop effectiveness in physical activity

Teacher 3: Socio-cultural Studies

  • Participation in Physical Activity
  • Physical Recreation and Outdoor Recreation
  • Physical Education and Outdoor Education
  • Sport
  • The United Kingdom
  • The USA
  • Australia

Spring Term

Teacher 1: Anatomy & Physiology

  • Response of the cardiovascular system to physical activity
  • The response of the respiratory system to physical activity

Teacher 2: Acquiring movement skills

  • Models of information processing and effectiveness in the learning and performance of movement skills
  • Memory and its role in developing movement skills
  • Reaction time and developing effective performance in physical activity
  • Motor and executive programmes and their impact on the learning of movement skills Types of motor control and their impact on movement skill acquisition and competence in physical activity
  • Schema theory and its role in developing movement skills and strategies
  • Transfer of learning to develop effectiveness in physical activity

Teacher 3: Socio-cultural studies

  • Funding of Physical Activity
  • Bodies influencing and promoting participation
  • Excellence and Participation in the UK
  • Performance Enhancing Products
  • Sport, Sponsorship and the Media
  • Violence in Sport
  • The Olympic Games

Summer Term

Students will complete revision materials, past-paper exams and prepare for their exam and for external moderation.

Assessments – May/June

Autumn Term

With one of their teachers, students will learn about particles and radiation, including the standard model of particle physics and the photon model of radiation. With their other teacher they will learn about electricity and electric circuits.

Spring Term

With one of their teachers, students will move on to study waves, including progressive waves, stationary waves and interference effects. With their other teacher they will move on to study mechanics, including scalars and vectors and Newton’s Laws of Motion.

Summer Term

With one of their teachers, students will move on to study materials. With their other teacher they will finish the topic of mechanics. Before the summer holidays they will begin the Year 13 course with introductions to circular motion and thermal physics.

Autumn Term

Students will have two teachers for psychology. Students will begin this term by studying cognitive psychology topic with one teacher. This will entail introducing encoding, capacity and duration of memory as well as the multi-store model of memory. The course will continue by focusing on types of long term memory and the working memory model. They will then move on to learn about explanations for forgetting including interference and retrieval failure. Finally the memory topic will focus on factors affecting the accuracy of eyewitness testimony including anxiety and misleading information, and how this accuracy can be improved via the use of the cognitive interview.

With the second teacher students will start to study social influence, covering concepts of conformity and obedience from a social psychological perspective. This will involve understanding the factors that contribute to conformity and obedience, research in this area and also understanding the reasons why some people are able to resist such pressures and behave independently. Students will have the opportunity to explore some well- known key research in psychology.

Research methods will also be integrated into the course throughout this term with the content being split between the two topics above in the most relevant areas.

Spring Term

With one other teacher, students will move on to the topic of psychopathology. This entails studying definitions of abnormality and how these can be applied to the examples of phobias, depression and OCD. Students will continue with these three disorders to include their clinical characteristics, explanations for their cause from a particular psychological perspective and finally the treatment available.

At the same time, with the other teacher, students will also be study developmental psychology during this term. This will involve the study of attachment whereby stages of attachment in infancy will be studied as well as animal studies of attachment. The topic will then consider explanations for attachment focusing on learning theories and Bowlby’s evolutionary theory. They will then look at the work of Mary Ainsworth and her strange situation technique. This will lead on to cultural variations in attachment. Finally, the topic focuses on how problems in formation or disruption of the attachment bond can lead to difficulties as explained by Bowlby’s material deprivation theory and the effects this can have as shown by the Romanian orphan studies. The final section serves to explain the influence of attachment on later relationships.

Research methods will also be integrated into the course throughout this term with the content being split between the two topics above in the most relevant areas.

Summer Term

This will begin with the remaining approaches in psychology, aiming to relate these approaches closely to what the students have studied so far. With one teacher, this will include the biological approach, focusing on the nervous and endocrine system as well as studying neurons and synaptic transmission. With the other teacher, this will entail studying psychodynamic approach, focusing on Sigmund Freud and the humanistic approach. Finally these approaches will be compared and contrasted.

On completion of this, the students will commence year 2 of the A Level, to include biopsychology in more detail and research methods.

Autumn Term

Students will be introduced to key concepts and theories in sociology, and will become familiar with the new terminology required at A Level. Students will begin to study education with special links to research methods. The key topics this term will explore class, gender and ethnic differences in educational achievement. They will also start to explore families and households including: couples, childhood and theories of families. Two internal assessments will take place.

Spring Term

Students will continue with education (the role of education and education policy and inequality). In families and households they will consider demography, family diversity and social policy. Later on in the term we will focus on sociological research methods in the context of education. Students will design and conduct a research study. A mock exam will take place during this term.

Summer Term

This final term will continue to focus on exam skills but we also start to explore the social distribution of Crime and Deviance including patterns and trends in crime and the Criminal Justice System. We start this topic area by focusing on crime and the media. Students will build up an extensive knowledge of media representations of crime and how these differ from official statistics on crime. Students will be able to evaluate the different views about the media as a cause of crime and the fear of crime. We will also explore the concept of ‘moral panics’ (an exaggerated over-reaction by society to a perceived problem, often fuelled by the media). Finally we consider cyber crime.

Autumn Term

  • Lifestyle, health and fitness
  • The world around us
  • Grammar programme

Spring Term

  • Youth culture and concerns
  • Education and employment
  • Grammar programme
  • Mock exams

Summer Term

  • Examination preparation
  • Past papers

Students studying Single Sport will complete a Cambridge Technical Extended Certificate. See below for the Double Sport curriculum.

Students studying Single Sport will complete two units of work in Year 12:

  • Unit 1: Body Systems and the Effects of Physical Activity
  • Unit 2: Sports Coaching and Activity Leadership

Autumn Term

Students will start the first unit of work.

Unit 1: Body Systems (externally assessed by an exam set by OCR – assessed at the end of January)

  • The structure and function of the skeletal, muscular, cardiovascular and respiratory system.
  • Know the different types of energy systems.

Spring Term

Students will start the second unit of work.

Unit 2: Sports Coaching (internally assessed by coursework)

  • Know the roles, responsibilities, and skills of sports coaches.
  • Know the techniques used by coaches to improve the performance of athletes.
  • Be able to plan sports coaching sessions.
  • Be able to deliver and review sports coaching sessions.

Summer Term

Students will complete the unit and prepare for external moderation which is due to take place in June/July.

Students are assessed throughout the course via different methods of assessment including:

  • Presentations
  • Reports
  • Factsheets
  • Practical analysis
  • Posters
  • Leaflets
  • Role play scenarios

For each unit of work students will be awarded a pass, merit or distinction grade.

Students studying Double Sport will complete a Cambridge Technical Diploma. See above for the Single Sport curriculum.

Students studying Double Sport will complete six units of work in Year 12:

  • Unit 1: Body Systems and the Effects of Physical Activity
  • Unit 2: Sports Coaching and Activity Leadership
  • Unit 4: Working Safely in Sport, Exercise, Health and Leisure
  • Unit 5: Performance Analysis in Sport and Exercise
  • Unit 8: Organising Sports Events
  • Unit 18: Practical Skills in Sport and Physical Activities

Autumn Term

Students will start the first three units of work. External moderation takes place in February half term.

Teacher 1 – Unit 1: Body Systems (externally assessed by an exam set by OCR – assessed at the end of January)

  • The structure and function of the skeletal, muscular, cardiovascular and respiratory system.
  • Know the different types of energy systems.

Teacher 2 – Unit 2: Sports Coaching (internally assessed by coursework)

  • Know the roles, responsibilities, and skills of sports coaches.
  • Know the techniques used by coaches to improve the performance of athletes.
  • Be able to plan sports coaching sessions.
  • Be able to deliver and review sports coaching sessions.

Teacher 3 – Unit 18: Practical Skills in Sport (internally assessed by coursework)

  • Demonstrate skills in individual and team sport.
  • Demonstrate techniques and skills in outdoor and adventurous activities.
  • Officiate in a sports competition.

Spring Term

Students will complete the first three units of work and prepare for external moderation which is due to take place in February. Once completed the students will start three further units of work.

Teacher 1 – Unit 4: Working Safely in Sport, Exercise, Health and Leisure (externally assessed – exam set by OCR – exam date in May)

  • Understand emergency procedures.
  • Understand health and safety requirements.
  • Understand how to minimise risks in sport.
  • Know first aid requirements for sport.
  • Know how to safeguard children and vulnerable adults.

Teacher 2 – Unit 5: Performance Analysis in Sport and Exercise

  • Understand performance profiling.
  • Be able to carry out performance profiling.
  • Be able to analyse performance.
  • Be able to give feedback on sports performance.

Teacher 3 – Unit 8: Organising Sports Events

  • Know different types of sports events and their purpose.
  • Know the different roles and responsibilities involved in the planning and delivery of sports events.
  • Be able to plan and promote a sports event.
  • Be able to participate in the delivery of a sports event.
  • Be able to review the planning and delivery of a sports event.

Summer Term

Students will complete the final three units and prepare for external moderation which is due to take place in June/July.

Students are assessed throughout the course via different methods of assessment including:

  • Presentations
  • Reports
  • Factsheets
  • Practical analysis
  • Posters
  • Leaflets
  • Role play scenarios

For each unit of work students will be awarded a pass, merit or distinction grade.